Last edited by Dakora
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Influenza, or Epidemic catarrhal fever found in the catalog.

Influenza, or Epidemic catarrhal fever

an historical survey of past epidemics in Great Britain from 1510-1890

by Edmund Symes Thompson

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  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Percival and Co. in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Other titlesAnnals of influenza.
Statementby E. Symes Thompson
ContributionsThompson, Theophilus, 1807-1860
The Physical Object
Paginationxv, 490 p. ;
Number of Pages490
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24396027M
OCLC/WorldCa14779466

  Thompson, T. in Annals of Influenza or Epidemic Catarrhal Fever in Great Britain from to (Sydenham Society, London, ). (Sydenham Society, London, ). Google ScholarCited by:   , Annals of influenza or epidemic catarrhal fever in Great Britain, page [In] May, there was, at London and in its neighbourhood, a disease very epidemic, though not fatal, which had some time before been very prevalent both in Italy and Germany.

  present participle of sipThe act of taking a sip. , Theophilus Thompson, Annals of Influenza Or Epidemic Catarrhal Fever in Great Britain from to (page ) But, in general, a few days' confinement, abstinence from flesh meat, and frequent sippings of some tepid pectoral drink, sufficed for the cure. Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a serious viral disease that can affect many species in the order Artiodactyla (even-toed ungulates) including cattle, bison, water buffalo, exotic ruminants, deer and other cervids, and pigs.

To use images and associated descriptions contained on this website, please contact the CFSPH.. These images were annotated by Dr. Steve Sorden and Dr. Claire Andreasen and funding was provided by a USDA Higher Education Challenge Grant in collaboration with the Iowa State University Department of Veterinary Pathology, Center for Food Security and Public Health (CFSPH), Armed Forces Institute. The first civilian cases in Los Angeles appeared on Septem although influenza was not made a reportable disease in California until September Amongst these first cases were 55 students at Polytechnic High School, at the time located on the corner of Washington Boulevard and Flower Street in downtown. Publicly, City Health Commissioner Dr. Luther Milton Powers only described the.


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Influenza, or Epidemic catarrhal fever by Edmund Symes Thompson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Influenza, or Epidemic Catarrhal Fever: An Historical Survey of Past Epidemics in Great Britain From (Classic Reprint) [Thompson, Edmund Symes] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Influenza, or Epidemic Catarrhal Fever: An Historical Survey of Past Epidemics in Great Britain From (Classic Reprint)Author: Edmund Symes Thompson.

Unknown, possibly Influenza: Thirteen Colonies: Measles: 3,+ Boston, United States: Boston yellow fever epidemic Yellow fever: ( in Charleston, in Philadelphia) Charleston and Philadelphia, United States: Influenza fever: New York City, United States: Yellow fever: 1, New France, Canada: Influenza Human history.

On The Influenza, Or Epidemic Catarrhal Fever Of - 8 [Thom. Bevill Peacock] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This is a reproduction of a book published before This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages.

In an acute respiratory disease emerged in Asia before spreading through North Africa and Europe during the first chronicled, inter-regional flu pandemic generally recognized by medical historians and epidemiologists. Influenza-like illnesses had been documented in Europe since at least Charlemagne, with 's outbreak the first to be called influenza, but the flu pandemic is the.

Get this from a library. On the influenza; or, Epidemic catarrhal fever of [Thomas B Peacock]. Get this from a library. Influenza or epidemic catarrhal fever; an historical survey of past epidemics in Great Britain from to [Theophilus Thompson; Edmund Symes Thompson].

Annals of Influenza Or Epidemic Catarrhal Fever in Great Britain from to circumstances clear cloudy cold common complaint considerable constitution continued cough course died disease disorder distemper early epidemic escaped especially evident expectoration facts fair fatal February fever four frequent Page - that the.

The Lancet SPECIAL ARTICLES MINOR EPIDEMICS OF "INFLUENZA" (EPIDEMIC CATARRH) A CLINICAL STUDY OF NINE SEASONS, G.M. Wauchope M.D., M.R.C.P. Lond. ASSISTANT PHYSICIAN TO THE NEW SUSSEX HOSPITAL, BRIGHTON (Concluded from p. ) Character of Individual Epidemics IN considering each year's epidemic as an entity, one recognises Author: G.M.

Wauchope. Influenza is caused by a virus that is transmitted from person to person through airborne respiratory secretions. An outbreak can occur if a new strain of influenza virus emerges against which the population has no immunity. The influenza pandemic of –19 resulted from such an occurrence and affected populations throughout the world.

An influenza virus called influenza type A subtype H1N1. INFLUENZA (syn. “grip,” la grippe), a term applied to an infectious febrile disorder due to a specific bacillus, characterized specially by catarrh of the respiratory passages and alimentary canal, and occurring mostly as an epidemic.

The Italians in the 17th century ascribed it to the influence of the stars, and hence the name “influenza.”. Full text of "Annals of influenza or epidemic catarrhal fever in Great Britain from to " See other formats.

In, and no epidemic of influenza occurred, though occasionally the weekly deaths from this disease rose slightly above the usual inter-epidemic level.

An epidemic occurred in December,and January,of low magnitude and somewhat protracted duration. A smarter epidemic of influenza occurred, cul- minating. Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is an infectious systemic disease that presents as a variable complex of lesions affecting mainly ruminants and rarely swine.

It is principally a disease of domestic cattle, water buffalo, Bali cattle (banteng), American bison, and deer. In addition to these farmed animals, MCF has been described in a variety of.

Buy Influenza, or Epidemic catarrhal fever: an historical survey of past epidemics in Great Britain from by Edmund Symes Thompson (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Paperback. Origin of the Pandemic Influenza Virus. The – influenza pandemic was caused by an influenza A virus of the H1N1 subtype.

Sequence analysis suggests that the ultimate ancestral source of this virus is almost certainly avian [10, 11].This is not an unexpected finding: the enteric tracts of waterfowl such as ducks and geese serve as reservoirs for all known influenza A Cited by: Influenza or Epidemic Catarrhal Fever in Great Bńtain from 15 10 to (London: Sydenham Society, ), hereafter cited as "Thompson," which contains many eighteenth-century works on influenza.

More recent treatments include A. Beare, ed., Basic and Applied Influenza Research (Boca Raton, Fla.: CRC Press, ); W. Beveridge.

Between and before Christ, Hippocrates and Livius report the extraordinary prevalence of catarrhal maladies in Greece and Rome, which Schuurrer and Hæser suppose to have been influenza.

Diodorus Siculus reports an epidemic, apparently of. World War I claimed an estimated 16 million lives. The influenza epidemic that swept the world in killed an estimated 50 million people. One fifth of the world's population was attacked by this deadly virus. Within months, it had killed more people than any other illness in recorded history.

The plague emerged in two phases. In late spring. The to H1N1 influenza pandemic is among the most deadly events in recorded human history, having killed an estimated 50 to million persons.

Recent H5N1 avian influenza epizootics associated with sporadic human fatalities have heightened concern that a new influenza pandemic, one at least as lethal as that ofcould be earlya novel pandemic H1N1 influenza.

This excellent book homes in on the detective race to secure samples of the flu and identify the genetic code of the virus that caused it. There are many other threads that the author could have followed, such as the appalling scale of human tragedy, the technical details of the virological study of the flu, and the shock value of our /5().

A disease referred to as “sweate” (English sweat, Sudor Anglicus) was repeatedly epidemic between andbut was considered by the physician Jean Fernel and others to be distinct from influenza. Only in the 19th century was sweate plausibly attributed Cited by: 7.“The certainty of uncertainty is the only kind of certainty.”John Allen Paulos []Pandemic and epidemic influenza have been appearing unexpectedly for at leastand possibly or more, years [2–10].Varying pandemic features include generation by different viral genetic mechanisms, association with mammalian epizootics/enzootics, occurrence at irregular intervals, and differences in Cited by: Epidemics that were probably influenza have been reported throughout recorded history.

There were 13 fairly severe epidemics during the 18th century and 12 during the 19th century. Probably 8 of these 25 were influenza pandemic. In the 20th century there have been 4 pandemic (/19, /58, Cited by: